My Heart is a Chainsaw by Stephen Graham Jones – Review

A horror obsessed Jade finds out that her hometown Proofrock is in danger—and despite some gruesome killings happening right under her nose, she is a little more thrilled than she needs to be that she’s finally experiencing a slasher in her own life.

Being an outcast in her hometown, a seventeen year old Native American girl named Jade Daniels utilizes horror movies as a coping mechanism to escape her abusive father and the rest of her environment. After discovering two murders that happened in Indian Lake, Jade starts thinking that this might be the start of a premeditated killing spree. In the meantime, the other side of Indian Lake lies Terra Nova; the former Shoshone territory has now been gentrified and altered into a construction site for the wealthy. While most people would be terrified of the continuous murders, Jade sees this as an opportunity to channel her inner Sherlock Holmes and depend on her slasher knowledge to solve the murder mystery.

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I’m Glad My Mom Died by Jennette McCurdy – Review

In this provocatively titled memoir, former iCarly star Jennette McCurdy details an honest account about her entire life as a child actress and how her mom dictated that journey.

iCarly was one of my favorite television shows as a teen, and I think that anyone who enjoyed watching it growing up can confirm that it was hilarious and entertaining. The role that Jennette McCurdy played—Sam Puckett—was particularly portrayed as witty, fearless and tough, but Jennette herself lived a very different life behind the scenes.

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Mid-Year Freak Out Book Tag 2022

It’s time to reflect on all the reading I’ve been doing in the past seven months, and I must say that 2022 has been a fairly good year for books so far! Originally a tag created by Ely from Earl Grey Books, this post is going to discuss the highlights of the books I’ve read:

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How to get out of a reading slump

It happens to the best of usthe most avid readers have encountered moments in their lives where they’re just not motivated to read anymore. Sometimes it’s due to personal reasons, like a burn-out, and other times it’s simply inexplicable.

Last year I was in a major reading slump where I read a whopping total of 10 books by December. This year, I’ve read 33 booksand it’s only July (which might still be low by book bloggers’ standards, but progress is what matters!).

I figured out a bunch of things to do that drew me back to the world of literature.

Here’s a list of what you can do as well to get over that wretched reading slump:

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Galatea by Madeline Miller – Review

Ovid’s Metamorphoses, while popular, can also be classified as being pretty misogynisticMadeline Miller spins this narrative, subverting the gendered tropes in her retelling of the epic tale.

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Mexican Gothic by Silvia Moreno-Garcia – Review

The grisly, the sublime, and moral quandaries are all fascinating aspects of the Gothic genreand Silvia Moreno-Garcia doesn’t shy away from them in her novel, Mexican Gothic.

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Circe by Madeline Miller – Review

Being the daughter of one of the most powerful gods might give you the most extravagant lifestyle you can imagine–yet Circe’s life is anything but that.

A tale of triumphs, grief, heartbreak, and ego-filled gods, Circe focuses on the peculiar daughter of Helios (god of the sun) and Perse (a nymph and naiad). Since her childhood, Circe the nymph has had to go through all sorts of trials and tribulations that her siblings don’t even have to–and she eventually snaps, getting ousted from the opulent house of Helios.

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Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk – Review

17 people go on a writer’s retreat to craft pretty words with no distractions, no contact with the outside world, all together in an abandoned theater for three months. What could possibly go wrong?

Synopsis:

Haunted by Chuck Palahniuk is a compilation of 14 disturbing short stories that are part of a bigger narrative. Following the lives of 19 people with names representative of the stories they tell, such as Saint Guts, Sister Vigilante, and Mother Nature. Palahniuk adds a much darker and satirical tone in a setting and premise that might remind the audience of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None.

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Piranesi by Susanna Clarke – Review

In the dream-like House encompassed by a sea, Piranesi is surrounded by beautiful statues, endless halls and even dangerous pathways. While this labyrinthine is the only thing he’s ever known, Piranesi discovers that there’s more to it than he realizes.

Synopsis:

The fantasy novel follows the journal entries of Piranesi, a man who lives in a place called the House comprising infinite vestibules, intricate statues, and even an ocean that sweeps back and forth in it. Being the sole inhabitant of the House – besides an occassional visitor he calls the Other whom he does research with – he explores and takes notes of every nook and cranny of it in his journal. From the tidal patterns to the skeletons and statues, Piranesi has great respect for this World – but things start getting fishy about the only place he’s ever known, and we’re not talking about the ones he catches for food.

Review:

Like the House, the prose itself is beautiful – Clarke somehow makes statues and fishing sound intriguing. Although many fantasy books can have complicated world-building that can confuse or bore readers, Clarke’s descriptions are delightfully entrancing. From Piranesi’s journal entries, his appreciation and awe for the House is more than conspicuous, calling himself the “Beloved Child of the House.” It’s akin to how many people often view religion:

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